News & Media

Advance Family Planning (AFP) tracks media coverage of significant family planning policy and program developments. Find links to news and opinion articles here, along with video commentary and interactive tools to convey the facts and realities of increasing access to quality contraceptive information, services and supplies.

Members of the Media: For more information about AFP or to schedule an interview, contact Beth Fredrick, Deputy Director, Advance Family Planning.


December 31, 2010
Uganda loses about $112m (sh275b) annually due to inadequate investment in maternal health and family planning, the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) has revealed. UNFPA assistant representative Dr. Wilfred Ochan said that the costs of unplanned pregnancies and complications related to unsafe abortions greatly affect investment in Uganda.
Source: AfriComNet
December 31, 2010
Is India doing marvelously well, or is it failing terribly? Depending on whom you speak to, you could pick up either of those answers with some frequency. One story runs something like this: "After decades of mediocrity and stagnation under 'Nehruvian socialism', the Indian economy achieved a spectacular take-off during the last two decades. This take-off, which led to unprecedented improvements in income per head, was driven largely by market initiatives. It involves a significant increase in inequality, but this is a common phenomenon in periods of rapid growth.
Source: Outlook India.com
December 31, 2010
A new survey indicates Kenya is one of the countries with the highest proportion of unplanned pregnancies. The report, The State of Kenya Population, launched in Nairobi as the world hit the seven billion population mark, shows 1.8 million married women have unplanned births every year.
Source: The Standard
December 31, 2010
This week, the birth of a baby somewhere took the world population past the seven billion mark. That's something to celebrate. Few thought the world could sustain that many people, ever - yet here we are. If you're over 45, world population has doubled in your lifetime, and it's still growing. But the news is not all good. As we pass the seven billion milestone, and go on to nine billion or more by 2050, we face a "perfect storm" of future needs for food, energy and water. There are already 600 million people today who can't count on eating tomorrow.
Source: GlobalPost
December 31, 2010
There will soon be seven billion people on the planet. By 2045 global population is projected to reach nine billion. Can the planet take the strain?
Source: National Geographic
December 31, 2010
The global demographic landscape is a complex one, and not surprisingly very difficult for many to comprehend. The media is alive with projections that the global population will reach seven billion people by the end of 2011, and will exceed nine billion by 2050, with much of this growth occurring in the least-developed countries, where a high rate of mortality is outweighed by an even higher rate of fertility.
Source: The World Today, Chatham House
December 31, 2010
Senegalese families are spacing their children, having fewer, and as a result are increasingly searching for long-term family planning solutions, said midwife Fatou Seck. While in 1990 the average woman in Senegal had 6.7 children in her reproductive cycle, in 2009 they had 4.8, according to the Health Ministry.
Source: IRIN - humanitarian news and analysis
December 31, 2010
The Constitutional Court in Kampala, Uganda, started a case against the Government of Uganda on preventable maternal deaths and the right to health. The case, Petition Number 16 of 2011, argues that by not providing essential medical commodities and health services to pregnant women, the government is violating the constitutional rights of Ugandans, including the right to health, the right to life, and the rights of women.
Source: Center for Health Human Rights & Development
December 31, 2010
Uganda's President Yoweri Museveni makes the link between fertility, productivity and the need to reach youth at an event organized by the Ugandan Population Secretariat and UNFPA.
Source: New Vision
December 31, 2010
At a recent meeting with a delegation of Eastern Uganda Women Mobilizes at his country home in Rwakitura, Kiruhuura district, President Museveni told the delegation that government would work with their associations to promote safe motherhood and solve the problem of high maternal death rates in Uganda.
Source: Partners in Population and Development Africa Regional Office
December 31, 2010
Uganda has been ranked among high fertility" countries in the world which will contribute most to the bulge in population size in the next decades a United Nations report has revealed. The World Population Prospects shows that these high fertility countries will see rising population growth till the end of the century.
Source: AfriComNet, May 11
December 31, 2010
Weak government policies on population growth through family planning programs have accounted for the uncontrolled population growth in Indonesia since the reform era, which could lead to serious problems in other related areas of life.
Source: The Jakarta Post
December 31, 2010
Senegalese families are spacing their children, having fewer, and as a result are increasingly searching for long-term family planning solutions, said midwife Fatou Seck. While in 1990 the average woman in Senegal had 6.7 children in her reproductive cycle, in 2009 they had 4.8, according to the Health Ministry.
Source: IRIN - humanitarian news and analysis
December 31, 2010
President Yoweri Museveni has said the government will give priority to the health of women and children."Our government will continue to treat the health of women and children as a development issue.
Source: New Vision
December 31, 2010
Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced funding for 28 new maternal and child health projects as part of the G8 Maternal, Newborn and Child Health Initiative that was announced during last year's G8 Summit in Muskoka. The 28 projects will share $82 million in funding between now and 2016. As of September 2011, the Government of Canada has allocated almost $740 million in Muskoka Initiative funding for 51 projects in 26 countries in Africa, the Americas and Asia.
Source: Action Canada for Population and Development (ACPD)
December 31, 2010
CONRAD, a leading reproductive health research organization, announced results of the SILCS Diaphragm contraceptive effectiveness study September 17th at the Reproductive Health 2011 Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada. The two-year study of 450 U.S. women implemented at six clinical sites in the U.S. showed that effectiveness rates of the new single size, contoured diaphragm are similar to traditional diaphragms. In addition, SILCS was shown to be easy to use and comfortable to wear.
Source: CONRAD
December 31, 2010
Letter to the editor by Dr. Duff Gillespie, director of Advance Family Planning, responding to an editorial A list to save the lives of mothers and children
Source: The Lancet
December 31, 2010
Visitors walking through the thatched houses of Bweremana, a village on the shore of Lake Kivu in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, are shadowed by a large, happy rabble of young children. There are, however, few middle-aged women in evidence - perhaps not surprising in a country where a woman's average life expectancy is 49.
Source: The Washington Post
December 31, 2010
Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper today announced support for new health initiatives to help save the lives of mothers and children in Africa and Asia as part of the Canadian-led Muskoka Initiative launched at the G-8 Summit in June 2010. Targeting the leading causes of mortality in mothers and children in countries such as Sudan, Tanzania, Nigeria, Mali and Afghanistan, the new initiatives will support comprehensive and integrated approaches to provide the necessary health services for mothers and children.
Source: Prime Minister of Canada, Stephen Harper
December 31, 2010
When it comes to population growth, the United Nations has three primary projections. The medium projection, the one most commonly used, has world population reaching 9.2 billion by 2050. The high one reaches 10.5 billion. The low projection, which assumes that the world will quickly move below replacement-level fertility, has population peaking at 8 billion in 2042 and then declining. If the goal is to eradicate poverty, hunger, and illiteracy, then we have little choice but to strive for the lower projection.
Source: Guardian Development Network
December 31, 2010
The population of the world, long expected to stabilize just above 9 billion in the middle of the century, will instead keep growing and may hit 10.1 billion by the year 2100, the United Nations projected in a report released Tuesday. Growth in Africa remains so high that the population there could more than triple in this century, rising from today's one billion to 3.6 billion, the report said - a sobering forecast for a continent already struggling to provide food and water for its people.
Source: New York Times
December 31, 2010
The UN now predicts that the human population of the planet will most likely reach 10 billion people by the year 2050. The new projections offer an opportunity to move beyond the flawed framework of population control and towards global activism on behalf of women.
Source: The Atlantic Blog
December 31, 2010
Following a press conference in Tanzania on the FP funding issue, HDT and partners issued a press statement praising the government for its action to increase FP funding from its own funds. A similar letter was also sent to the Minister of Health & Social Welfare.
Source: The Coalition of Tanzanian Non-Governmental Organizations
December 31, 2010
On March 11, 2011, the Ugandan Ministry of Health announced new guidelines for providing women greater access to contraceptive injectables. This policy shift will increase access to injectable contraceptives through community-based distribution.
Source: fhi360
December 31, 2010
After a half-century of forming new states from former colonies and from the breakup of the Soviet Union, the international community is today faced with the opposite situation: the disintegration of states. The most systematic ongoing effort to analyze countries' vulnerability to failure is one undertaken by the Fund for Peace and published in each July/August issue ofForeign Policy. The research team analyzes 177 countries and ranks them according to "their vulnerability to violent internal conflict and societal deterioration," based on 12 social, economic, and political indicators.
Source: Earth Policy Institute

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