Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs

The Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP) supports the Advance Family Planning coalition from its headquarters in Baltimore, as well as through its local entities in Indonesia and Tanzania.

CCP designs communication solutions that solve public health problems. Its core strengths include:

  • Social and behavior change communication – to influence social norms and individual health behaviors
  • Knowledge Management – to put correct, concise and timely information into the hands of health providers
  • Capacity Strengthening – of communication professionals at all levels, in all types of organizations
  • Research and Evaluation – to build the evidence base for our work and our field

CCP was established over 25 years ago in recognition of the pivotal role communication plays in the way people think and behave about health and development issues. It is a Center within the Department of Health, Behavior and Society at the Bloomberg School of Public Health. CCP has active programs in more than 30 countries worldwide as well as in the U.S.

Most importantly, CCP makes a difference in people’s lives.

2016

Brief: Investing in Family Planning for Tanzania’s Health and Development

Source: Health Promotion Tanzania, United Nations Association Tanzania

A new brief entitled Investing in Family Planning for Tanzania’s Health and Development highlights the Government of Tanzania’s tremendous commitment to family planning and achievements in addressing the population’s family planning needs since 2012. It also recommends next steps for policymakers to intensify efforts towards attaining family planning goals. Previously released in February 2016, the brief was updated and released in October 2016 to include the latest preliminary Demographic and Health Survey (pDHS) 2015-16 data.

About one in three women currently use contraception in Tanzania (pDHS 2015-16). In 2012 at the London Summit on Family Planning, the government took action, making six political commitments with the goal of attaining a national contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) of 60%. These commitments garnered the support of government representatives, members of Parliament, civil societies and non-governmental organizations, development partners, and the private sector.

The report captures significant achievements towards those commitments, including:

  • Releasing a total of five billion shillings from the government’s own sources for the 2014-2015 fiscal year to procure and distribute family planning commodities and supplies.
  • Increasing family planning allocations in the health budgets of several districts in the Lake Zone.
  • Doubling the number of family planning users in the Mara region, which has the lowest CPR in the country, over a period of just nine months (October 2013–June 2014).
  • Making family planning as one of the top priority interventions in the 2014-2015 National Road Map Strategic Plan to Accelerate Reduction of Maternal, Newborn and Child Deaths dubbed as One Plan II.

The brief affirms that in order “to meet its national family planning targets, Tanzania needs all levels of government, the private sector, and civil society to maintain strong commitment to ensure that the resources, commodities and systems are in place.” It recommends four main steps to continue progress.

The report is a joint effort by Health Promotion Tanzania and United Nations Association of Tanzania. View the report and recommendations online. For hard copies and more information, please contact:

Halima Shariff

hshariff@jhuccptz.org

 

2015

CASE STUDY: Tanzanian Higher Learning Institutions Prioritize Access to Family Planning for Students

Source: AFP

Beginning in October 2014, several higher learning institutions (HLIs) in Tanzania banded together to improve their students’ access to sexual and reproductive health information and services. The effort started modestly—with 13 HLIs in the largely rural regions of Mwanza and Shinyanga. One year later, the initiative is poised to benefit over 18,000 students in the two regions and has contributed to a nationwide policy change to mandate sexual and reproductive health service provision in all 52 HLIs in Tanzania.

2015

ÉTUDE DE CAS: Les Groupes de Travail de Plaidoyer en Indonésie revitalisent la Planification Familiale dans les districts

Source: AFP

Avec un solide parcours en planification familiale et une implication remarquée des leaders nationaux sur le sujet, l’Indonésie laisse présager un avenir prometteur vers l’accomplissement de ses engagements de Planification Familiale 2020 (PF2020) et de ses objectifs nationaux. Mais le pays fait face à un défi de taille: promouvoir cet engagement dans les gouvernements décentralisés. En raison de la décentralisation et déconcentration des pouvoirs, de nombreuses décisions concernant le budget et les programmes sont prises par les décideurs locaux dans plus de 500 districts et municipalités.

2015

ÉTUDE DE CAS: Le gouvernement de Tanzanie alloue 2 milliards de shillings à la planification familiale pour 2014-2015

Source: AFP

Pour l’année fiscale 2014-2015, le gouvernement de Tanzanie a alloué deux milliards de shillings (soit 1,15 millions de dollars) à la planification familiale –l’allocation la plus importante depuis la création de la ligne budgétaire de planification familiale en 2010, et une augmentation de 100% du budget 2013-2014.

AFP Resources
Date Title Sourcesort descending
2016

étud de cas: Revitaliser la planification familiale dans les villages d'Indonésie

Un changement récent des lois indonésiennes permet aux dirigeants des plus petites unités de gouvernance –les villages– d’exercer de plus grandes...
2016

étud de cas: Les Instituts d'Enseignement Supérieur en Tanzanie font de l'accès des étudiants à la planification familiale une priorité

Au début du mois d’octobre 2014, plusieurs Instituts d’Enseignement Supérieur (IES) en Tanzanie ont joint leurs forces pour améliorer l’accès des...
Advance Family Planning
2014

Ensuring Access to Family Planning for All in Tanzania

This document highlights Tanzania's FP2020 commitment and the advocacy and policy priorities for Advance Family Planning.
Advance Family Planning
2014

Tanzanian NGOs and Government Open Door to Improve Contraceptive Supply System

On October 24, 2012, the MoHSW authorized new accountability guidelines allowing non-governmental organizations to access contraceptive commodities...
AFP
2014

Addressing Contraceptive Stock-outs Caused by Procurement Delays in Tanzania

In August 2013, the Government of Tanzania approved a major change in how it purchases contraceptives in an effort to ensure a consistent flow of...
AFP
2016

Brief: Investing in Family Planning for Tanzania’s Health and Development

A new brief entitled Investing in Family Planning for Tanzania’s Health and Development highlights the Government of Tanzania’s tremendous commitment...
Health Promotion Tanzania, United Nations Association Tanzania
Other Resources
Date Title Sourcesort descending
2014

K4Health Family Planning Advocacy Toolkit

The K4Health Family Planning Advocacy Toolkit provides advocates at all levels, including international, national and community leaders,...
K4Health
AFP Resources
Date Title Sourcesort descending
2016

étud de cas: Les Instituts d'Enseignement Supérieur en Tanzanie font de l'accès des étudiants à la planification familiale une priorité

Au début du mois d’octobre 2014, plusieurs Instituts d’Enseignement Supérieur (IES) en Tanzanie ont joint leurs forces pour améliorer l’accès des...
Advance Family Planning
2015

CASE STUDY: Revitalizing Village-level Family Planning in Indonesia

A recent change in Indonesia’s laws enables leaders in the smallest government unit—villages—to assume greater responsibility and control over local...
AFP
2015

CASE STUDY: Tanzanian Higher Learning Institutions Prioritize Access to Family Planning for Students

Beginning in October 2014, several higher learning institutions (HLIs) in Tanzania banded together to improve their students’ access to sexual and...
AFP
2016

Brief: Investing in Family Planning for Tanzania’s Health and Development

A new brief entitled Investing in Family Planning for Tanzania’s Health and Development highlights the Government of Tanzania’s tremendous commitment...
Health Promotion Tanzania, United Nations Association Tanzania

For More Information

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Center for Communication Programs
111 Market Place, Suite 310
Baltimore, MD  21202
Telephone: +1 (410) 659 6300

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Center for Communication Programs
The CEO (Cilandak Executive Office), 5th Floor
JL TB Simatupang No 18C, Cilandak
Jakarta 12430
Indonesia
Telephone: +62 (21) 726 2916

Alice Payne Merritt

Director of Global Programs, Center for Communication Programs – Baltimore

+1 (410) 659 6241

Alice Payne Merritt, MPH, is the Director of Global Programs at CCP, and provides technical guidance to AFP. She has over 25 years of field experience in behavior change communication and has designed and managed a wide variety of health communication programs including national reproductive health campaigns, community-based efforts and enter-education initiatives. She is responsible for all aspects of CCP’s involvement in AFP and the strategic direction of its work.

Fitri Putjuk

Director, Center for Communication Programs - Indonesia

Fitri currently serves as the Indonesia Country Representative for CCP. She joined CCP in 1995 and her main role is to provide technical assistance to local partners, government, NGOs, professional organizations and donors in communication focusing on family planning and reproductive health (FP/RH), maternal and child health, the environment and hygiene-improvement programs. She is now managing the AFP program together with two other key staff in Indonesia and working closely with 15 well-known Indonesian FP/RH Champions from a variety of backgrounds. She is AFP’s chief liaison with USAID, UNFPA, AUSAID and other donors in Indonesia.

Halima Shariff

Director, Advance Family Planning Tanzania

Halima is an accomplished Tanzanian media specialist, and communication and strategist with more than 30 years experience. She has more than two decades of experience and knowledge in smart advocacy and public policy in sexual and reproductive health. Halima is co-chair of the Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition Advocacy and Accountability Working Group.

 

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